DrMyers’s Blog

November 19, 2008

House Negro: United We Stand!

Coming from the south, and also being an African-American, my vernacular is usually detected any, and everywhere I go.  East Texans have a “Bite” to their dialect that can not be duplicated anywhere else, but can be detected in any room or in any crowd.  Aint, Ya’ll, Fixin’ to’, sho’nuff, can be the preface to any question you’d like to ask in the American language, yes we southerners have our own way of speaking and talking.  Because of this, their are terms used in the south that have negatively branded the way we think of the people who reside below the Mason-Dixon line.  

Interracial couples are careful when traveling together through the southern states at night.  Due to the history of words stated by some of it’s inhabitants followed by action, some blacks are frightened to sojourn alone through this beautiful part of the country.  That’s right, here, in the 21st century, some have fear of the mindsets held by citizens in which they share a social contract.  Nigger & Coon are two words that can also preface many sentences you might here down south, that still brings my heart to a standstill.  See, I was first called a nigger when I was nine years old as I walked to school.  At 25, me hearing the chilling stories of my 95 year old grandfather, as tears come down his cheeks explaing about a friend of his who was beat to death just for being accused of looking at a white-woman.  My first girlfriend was white, and we broke up in the fifth grade, because her mother did not know I was black, and when she found out, my girlfriend was in a world of trouble.  When a good friend of my decided to date a black guy, notes of folly were passed around the class calling her a “Nigger Lover”, and today I live in Navarro County, a County that in its dark history had a black man Burned at the Stake while thousands of people watched.  America does not have a flawless past, and even in its present existence, there’s a tone of work that needs to be done.  

However, on November 5th, America woke up to a fact that could not be denied.  A black male, of African-decent, who in times past might have been discriminated against or even abused, had been elected to represent the voices of millions who live in this country.  A peaceful transfer of power, Barack Obama represented a tangible dream held by Dr. King, and a hopeful future to all the children born on Nov. 5th.  For the children born on that date, would have been born to never know America’s highest office to be held by one race only.  Yes We Can!, shouted so many people, of different races, of different ages, in different countries, America inspired the world once again, like it had so many times before.  

Today, Wednesday November 19th, a statement was made that sent a signal to all of America.  This statement did not concern the pirates both off of the coasts of Somalia and in the Halls of Congress, but this statement, drew from a southern vernacular, and attempted to formulate a picture of our President, using some paint from our past.  A senior member of Al-Queda stated that not only Our President, but other black elected officials were nothing but House Slaves (Negro’s).  

To those who thought that Al-Queda was dead and or in non existence, this is a perfect example of the lengths they would go to, in getting our attention and the attention of the world.  This statement, although disgracing and vile, can be rebutted only in one way.  For the American People, to stand united, and say Yes We Can!, by no longer tolerating Hate/Ignorance by our peers.  To all of those people who did not vote for Obama because he we was “Muslim” or as I like to call it “Negro”, and to all of those people who were afraid that he was “new and not experienced” or as I like to call it “Negro”, lets band together truly as one nation, and stand behind our President Elect.  

The only way that the statements from Al-Queda will not be true is if we all become house Negros!  Let me tell you what a house negro is.  This term was used to differentiate between the slaves who worked primarily in the fields and those who worked primarily in the house.  The slaves who worked in the “Big House”, worked closely with the slave owners, and either cared for/nursed the kids, cared for the owners in time of sickness, at times holding sexual relationships with the owners, and even being educated at the owners discretion.  The point is, this person was a slave or servant, and regardless of the opportunities given, often times the hatred for his/her owner was suppressed, and his/her duties were carried out.  

I believe if we here in America, stand together, and adopt the servants heart, these statements will not only carry no weight, but will definitely show that our past is behind us, and our future looks more grand than ever.  United We Stand, as servants to one another, pledging our duty to aiding in the well being of our neighbors, our selves, and our nation.  This is our creed, of being a country as good as its promise, and holding true to its word.

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.